Funding my daughter’s marriage

Now that my daughter Rinki is going to be 23 soon, it is time to start thinking that she will get married in a few years. Of course, given the fact that she is in the second year of her BM program at XLRI and will probably work a few years before getting married, I think we are still looking at another 4 years or so, maybe 5. However, given the kind of expenses it entails one must plan for it in advance.

As my regular readers will know well I do not have separate portfolios assigned to specific financial goals. I simply have 3 portfolios of Debt, Stocks and MF where I invest in and take out money from these as and when needed. So far this has really not been needed as I have always had enough to spend from my active income. This is true even in my current state of Financial independence but may not remain so at the point of time my daughter gets married. There is thus a need to plan for this.

In general, my idea always had been that I will pay for my children’s graduation, no matter how much it cost, and also a reasonable amount in their marriage. Post graduation was something I wanted my children to fund themselves, normally through a bank loan or even taking some money as a loan from me. I did not see much point in paying high interest rates to the banks. This will burden the child with high EMI and restrict his or her freedom to make the right choices.

Based on all of these, when Rinki got admitted to XLRI we took a 12 lacs loan even though the course fees were in the range of 22 lacs. The idea was that I will pay much of the first year fees and she would get it paid by the bank in the second year. Total costs for the first year was 10.5 lacs and we took only 50000 from the bank. This was needed to keep the loan valid. In the second year the fees to be paid are as follows – 4.71 lacs in June, 2.5 lacs in August and 2.5 lacs in November. Right now we have paid the first 4.71 lacs through our own resources – Rinki had some internship money from her Summer stint in GE, one of the FMP I had earlier done for her reached maturity and a FD I had done some years back matured now. Under ordinary circumstances I may have needed the money for my expenses but as my active income is going well in 2017 the flexibility is quite a lot more.

With the above backdrop and the assumption that Rinki is likely to get a job which will pay her at least the median salary in XLRI, I have worked out the following plan with her

  • We will try to restrict the bank loan to 4.5 lacs or so.
  • In the first year of her job, she will pay back the loan in full. Along with the interest this may come to 40000 per month.
  • Assuming that she gets a take home salary of 1.2 lacs per month and needs to spend about 40000 on regular expenses, she will still have 40000 left as surplus in year 1.
  • From year 2 the surplus is obviously a lot more.

What about the money I have paid for her PG education? It will amount to about 14 lacs and I do not want her to pay it back to me. I have asked her to invest it in a portfolio of 4-5 MF over the next 3 years @ 40000 per month. Over this period the amount of the corpus will be 17.4 lacs and in 4 years it will be about 20 lacs. This is the amount I plan to utilise for her marriage. Yes, the costs may be more and if so, I will fund the gap.

What if she decides not to get married at all or get married later. Well, in the first case the money is her’s to use in any manner she wants to. In the second case, the money will remain invested and we will be using it as and when she gets married.

For my son the issues will be simpler as the marriage expenses are likely to be lower. Also, like I did for myself, I am hoping he will be able to foot the bill to some extent, if not for all of it like I did. That is way down the future though, at least 8 years if not more.

Advertisements

Saving for your own marriage or education? Here’s how

Our social norms and practices have undergone huge changes in the past decade or so and this is a continuous process. One area where this is seen quite starkly is how marriages are arranged and carried out today. In the older days the parents were most likely to find a match for their child, arrange the marriage logistics and of course pay for the same. Given the fact that people married relatively young, especially the women, it made sense to do this then.

Times have changed greatly now, especially in urban India. The incomes have increased manifold but so have the responsibilities of parents. Increased cost of school education, high graduation costs and not really being able to depend on children for the retired years like before has created a need for funding retirement to a much greater extent than ever before. Also, as children nowadays prefer to choose their own partners and have their own ideas about how the marriage should take place. In this kind of situation it makes a lot of sense for the children to plan for their own marriage expenses. Of course the parents will give gifts etc as per their financial bandwidth but in case there is a seriously expensive wedding, that needs to be planned by the child.

So, let us say you are just out of college and are in a job which pays you about 50000 Rs a month. How do you go about planning your life at 22, when many things are not really firmed up for the near term or far term? For example, you may want to do an MBA, may have ideas to start something on your own in a few years time or may have an idea of getting married in 6-8 years time. While you do not have to decide exactly on what course of action you want to follow, it will be important for you to invest from the beginning in a fairly disciplined manner. This will enable you to have the financial ability to do the spend when required.

How do you start? We will assume that your initial salary is 50000 a month and this will increase at 10 % every year. You should be doing the following:-

  • You really do not need insurance so do not spend on it. For debt investments your PF is adequate but as a matter of good habit open a PPF account and put 5000 every month in it.
  • With the above and your monthly expenditure you should still be able to invest 10000 per month in MF fairly easily. In case you can do more, all the better.
  • With every passing year increase this amount by 5000 Rs per month. This should not be difficult with your annual increments or job changes, if any.
  • Assuming you plan to work for 5 years before you need the money and it grows at 12 % every year how does it look?
    • Initial 10000 for 5 years will grow to 8.24 lacs
    • Next 5000 for 4 years will grow to 3.09 lacs
    • Next 5000 for 3 years will grow to 2.17 lacs
    • Next 5000 for 2 years will grow to 1.36 lacs
    • Final 5000 for 1 year will grow to 0.64 lacs
  • So in 5 years you will have a corpus of 15.5 lacs.
  • You will also have about 5 lacs in your PPF account

With this in place you can easily plan for your marriage or higher education. For example if you want to do an MBA from ISB the cost is about 30 lacs today. You can use part of your corpus and also take an Education loan. In case you are looking at funding your marriage, the amount in your corpus should be adequate for most weddings.

Now many financial planners will tell you that you must not put money in equity for 5 years etc. Do not listen to them at all. Firstly you are creating an MF portfolio which you may or may not want to redeem in 5 years time. So, strictly speaking there is no real need to think of it as 5 years. If you do not need the money, you just continue with the portfolio as normal. Just to motivate you a little more, if you keep investing 10000 for 25 years, at a return of 12 %, you will end up with 1.9 crores from just here.

I hope this has given all the new earners a lot of food for thought. You need to be in charge of your finances now. So far your life events have been largely managed and almost wholly funded by your parents. Now is the time to really chart out your own course and depend on your own resources for the same.

Once you make up your mind to do this, success is almost guaranteed.

Educational costs & inflation – A personal perspective

May is that time of the year when all parents of college going children have to figure out ways and means of arranging the fees for the upcoming semester, term or year in college, as the case may be. I have been in this situation for 5 years now and am likely to be in it for a few years more, given that I have two children.

Let me give a brief background for new readers here. My daughter Rinki has graduated from BITS Pilani, Hyderabad campus with BE in ENI. After her graduation in 2016, she has joined XLRI for their BM program and has now completed her first year there. My son Ronju is doing a 5 year dual degree course from BITS Pilani, Goa campus in Msc Maths and BE Computer Science. He will graduate in 2019 from there. If you are interested in knowing more about the overall costs and how I arranged for the funds etc, you can read up several posts available in the blog under “Education” category.

In this post I particularly wanted to discuss about the overall costs of a college degree in BITS and the inflationary nature within the course. Unlike some colleges, which give you a total figure for the 4 or 5 year course when you join, BITS only talks of the first year costs and then increases it every year. They have been transparent to say that the fees can increase by up to 15 % a year and, more often than not, it actually increases by that much. Let me take the component of the Tuition fee and see how it increased during the time Rinki was in college :-

  • In her first year 2012-2013, Tuition fee was 70000 per semester or 1.4 lacs in the year.
  • In 2013-2014, it was 78000 per semester or 1.56 lacs for the year.
  • In 2014-2015, it was 89000 per semester or 1.78 lacs for the year.
  • In 2015-2016, it was 101000 per semester or 2.02 lacs for the year.

Now apart from these there were Admission fees, hostel fees, mess fees, personal expenses, travel, practice school fees etc. From my notes I can see that the total expenses for her college degree was approximately 12 lacs.

At XLRI the overall costs are in the range of 24 lacs and you can add another 2 lacs or so for travel etc. Therefore her total Education costs in college is about 38 lacs.

For my son Ronju the last 2 years of Rinki will be common. Beyond this the fees for the other 3 years are as follows:-

  • in 2016-2017, it was 1.13 lacs per semester or 2.26 lacs for the year.
  • In 2017-2018, it is 1.30 lacs per semester or 2.60 lacs for the year.
  • in 2018-2019 it will be 1.5 lacs per semester or 3 lacs for the year.

Therefore for Ronju’s graduation the overall costs will be in the range of 20 lacs or so. I have not thought about his PG yet, as he is not sure whether he wants to do one. However if it is from a good B school, it will be in the range of 28-30 lacs. Assuming this to be the case, his total costs of college education will be in the range of 50 lacs or so.

From the above data you will be getting a pretty good picture of the educational inflation too. In 5 years the tuition fees has increased from 1.4 lacs to 3 lacs. The other costs have also increased and as you can see, a 4 year course for BITS starting today will easily cost more than 22 lacs or so, all things considered. Just the Tuition fees will be 13 lacs or so.

How will this look if your child is starting college after 15 years? Well, at an inflation of 15 % the tuition fees alone will be 1.8 crores. I know this sounds fantastic, but remember just 10 years back the Tuition fees of BITS was 50000 a year and it has gone up more than 5 times.

I am happy to spend this amount on giving a good education to my children as it is going to be a huge competitive differentiating aspect. However, I was able to do so as I prepared for the same in terms of my planning. Even then the inflation was surprisingly high and I had to rejig some of my plans.

You need to work on your plans right now and put them in place.

Children’s marriage – a financial goal?

In one of my earlier posts I had written as to why I do not consider the marriage of my children to be a life goal for me. I believe, they have been brought up in a way such that they can select their own partner for life when the time comes. Yes, as parents we will be supportive of it and may also interact with the families of their would be spouses according to the prevalent social norms but, neither my wife nor me, think that we have to initiate the process of finding a bride or groom for our children.

Some of the feedback I have received to the post is a pointer to what is wrong with our societal mindset till today. Sample some of this :-

  • If the girl is not having a good education, she may want to get married at the age of 22 or so. People saying this need to realise that if a girl is being brought up from her early childhood to simply get married after a perfunctory graduation, she is hardly going to have the motivation to do anything else in life. In this day and age, we as parents need to give wings to our girls, not shackle them with chains so early in life.
  • If a son is unable to find a suitable life partner on his own, it is the responsibility of his parents to do that for him. Well, I have no real issues with the parents taking an initiative in this matter as long as it is just for facilitation. Unfortunately, in most cases it turns out to be deterministic and two people, who have little going for themselves in terms of compatibility, get married to each other largely because their families are fine with it. The consequences, often, are quite disastrous.
  • Others said that while it was good in principle for the children to foot the bill of the marriage, how will they do it at such an early age etc. My thoughts on this are very simple – fund the marriages of your children to your heart’s content, as long as you can afford it without affecting what else you desire in life. If you are having a grand wedding but do not have enough money for your retirement years, then there is a lot wrong in how you are thinking through your decisions.

Having gone through those above, let us examine why I think it is a good idea to fund the marriages of children through them. We live in a very different world and social milieu today as compared to even 10-20 years back. At these times the parents were taking complete responsibility of their children till they got married and this included higher education as well as marriage. The underlying assumption was that the children, in turn, would take care of their parents, at least financially, when the time arrived. Today we dare not depend on such hopes as parents and therefore need to look at things with a lot more objectivity and logic rather than just filial emotion. The other thing that has changed is the cost of both higher education as well as marriage. Even 15 years back a B school degree used to cost about 3 lacs, today the same figure is close to 25 lacs. A degree in Engineering with associated expenses has gone up from 2 lacs to 16 lacs plus in the same period. So if you are sponsoring just the first graduation degree of your child you are probably paying more than what our parents paid for all these together.

Coming to the issue as to whether the children can fund their own marriages at such a young age. Well, I think that no son should marry till he is about 28 and this can probably be 25 or so for a girl. This will give then 4-6 years of working life which can be quite adequate to save up for the wedding. Of course, if they are paying a high student loan then the idea should be to pay it off first. Also, if you have the bandwidth as a parent to sponsor either a PG education OR the marriage, I will say choose the first.

I will write other posts on typical wedding costs and how these could possibly be funded by the children, but for now, let us look at a situation where you want to foot the bill. As long as you are being reasonable about the spending according to your own financial bandwidth there is nothing wrong with it. Unfortunately, Indian weddings today have become a spectacle of unmitigated desire to show off money, promoted by mindless and rather vulgar consumerism. I have seen many parents go completely out of the way, in order to show up their relatives and neighbours. At the end of the day, such reckless expenditure cravings often have rather sad endings.

My own experience here will not be out of order. I had worked for about 5 years and a bit when I got married to Lipi. Though I lived a good life as a bachelor in Delhi, I did manage to save a fair bit in those years. In 1993 the world in India was a different place and weddings were expensive affairs but not exorbitantly so yet. In order to comply with my mother’s wishes about how the wedding should be done, I ended up spending most of my accumulated savings and was quite happy to do so. I remember being so broke that Lipi had to sponsor the train tickets for our honeymoon in Panchmarhi. I never thought anything about spending for my wedding as my father had spent a lot of money for my education and those of my sisters. Yes, they were less expensive then but his salary as an Engineer in SAIL was also not a lavish one. 

So coming back to the core issue, is the marriage of your children a financial goal for you? Yes, if you want it to be but look upon it as the least priority item, after your own retirement and children’s education. If you have enough money, do what you want with it. However, if your children are unable or unwilling to take responsibility for their lives when they are 26-28 years of age there is a basic issue. Also, if you have brought up your daughter letting her think she just has to complete her graduation somehow and marriage is her only real goal in life, there really is a huge problem.

Coming to my children, I do hope they will choose their own partners when they want to get married. I will fund their marriage to the extent I deem logical but if they want to indulge in crass consumerism, they can foot the bill on their own. By then, they should be doing rather well in life and will be able to afford it quite well anyway.